Frequently Asked Questions

Q. What are the requirements to be a registered voter in the Virgin Islands?

  • Must be a citizen of the United States.
  • Must be eighteen years of age or turn 18 before the next election.
  • Must meet the residency requirement
  • Must be residing in the territory at least (90) days before a primary or General election.
  • Must be residing in the election district at least ninety (90) days.
  • Not be convicted felon who has not been discharged or pardoned.
  • Not have been adjudged mentally incompetent as to your ability to vote by a court of competent jurisdiction.
  • Not be registered elsewhere - in any other State or Territory of the United States or in any foreign country or any other election district.

Q. What documents are required for registration?

  • Birth Certificate or
  • Passport (United States) or
  • Military Discharge form (DD214) or
  • Naturalization Certificate

Copied documents will not be accepted.

Q. How can I apply to register to vote?
It's easy! Apply in person at one of the following locations in this link.

Q. What are the Political Parties in the Virgin Islands?
There are three (3) political parties in the Virgin Islands, they are:

  • Independent Citizens Movement Party of the Virgin Islands
  • The Republican Party of the Virgin Islands
  • The Democratic Party of the Virgin Islands

Q. Do I have to choose a Political Party?

No, you can become a No Party affiliate. You will not be allowed to vote in the Primary election. Primary elections are for members of parties only.

Q. What is the difference between Political Parties?
The Election System of the Virgin Islands is NOT allowed to represent any one party. For additional information on parties go to:

http://www.vivote.gov/

Q. Do I have to get a picture I.D. card?
Law requires an I.D. be issued, but on Election Day you would be required to show a form of identification as a first time voter.

Q. How much does it cost to get an I.D. card?
The first I.D. card issued to you is free, but if you lose or misplace your I.D. card the second one will cost you twenty five dollars ($25.00)

Q. Does the registration card have an expiration date?
The registration card is good as long as you are an active registered voter.

If you have not voted at the last two general elections your registration will be canceled.

Q. If I miss an election can it be checked to see if I am still on the files?
Yes, contact you district Election Office at one of the following numbers.

  • St. Thomas- St. John – (340) 774-3107 or (340) 776-6535
  • St. Croix – (340) 773-1021

Q. When is it too late to apply to register to prior an election?
You must be registered no later than 30 days prior to an election in which you wish to vote.

Q. How do I change my party affiliation, name, address etc…?
Changing affiliation, name, address etc… must be done in person at any of the Election System’s office, by completing the necessary form.

Special Registration Issues:
If you are in the military you may contact the Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP). For further information or to obtain a Federal Post card Application (FPCA). Call 1-800-438-8683 or email the program at vote@fvap.gov. You can also contact the Election System of the Virgin Islands at 340-773-1021 or 340-774-3107.

Q. How many ways can I vote in the Virgin Islands?

  1. You can vote at your poll on Election Day from 7:00AM to 7:00PM
  2. You can vote by absentee ballot if you fall into one of the following categories:
  • Member of the Armed Forces and Spouse or dependent.
  • A student residing outside the Territory.
  • An officer or employee of the Government of the V.I. or Government of the U.S.
  • Unable to appear because of illness or physical disability (permanent or temporary).
  • A patient in a hospital, nursing home or home for the aged.
  • Absent from district because of accompanying a spouse, parent or child who would be entitled to apply for the right to vote by absentee ballot.
  • Detained in jail awaiting action by a grand jury or trial, or has been confined in prison after a conviction for an offense other than a felony.
  • Any person who has not been out of the election district for more than 90 days prior to the date of the election for which absentee status is sought.

Religious Purposes:

Q. You can vote by provisional ballot.
A provisional ballot is used at the polls when an electors name is not found in the District Register. However, this ballot must be investigated by the Board of Elections.

Q. Do I have to present identification?
Yes, if it is the first time you will be voting

Q. What if I need assistance to vote the ballot?

If you inform the election officials that you need assistance you may ask someone of your choosing to assist you with the ballot and voting. An individual can assist only one elector. Anyone assisting an elector must take a sworn oath, and not reveal any information they may obtain.

Q. When can I obtain an absentee ballot?
Pursuant to Title 18 section 664 applications can be accepted up to 14 working days before the day of the election, lists are available after that.

Q. What if I make a mistake on the ballot?
If you are voting on the voting machine you cannot make a mistake. If you select the wrong candidates just depress the number you previously pressed and start over.

If you are voting on an absentee or provisional ballot you must sign the spoiled ballot and return it to the proper Election office or election official. Request a new ballot. Do not hesitate to ask to start over.

Q. What if I am at the poll and my current address differs from what appears on my voter registration card.
If your registration card is in the district register you will be allowed to vote. If your registration card is not in the district register you will be advised of the proper polling site or given a provisional ballot.

Q. What if my name is not in the district register and the election official cannot confirm my registration.
If your name is not in the district register and the election official cannot confirm your registration you will be given a provisional ballot.

Q. Who can Challenge my ballot?
Any elector may be challenged by any qualified elector of the district, and any Watcher (candidate representative or representatives of issues) can challenge an elector. Any person challenging another individual swears or affirms to the oath administered.

Q. Where can I get information about my rights and responsibilities as a voter?
You can get information about my rights and responsibilities as a voter form the Election System’s offices, form the website www.vivote.gov or view the information at the polls.

Q. Am I entitled to time off in order to vote?
Yes, The day on which general elections are held shall be a legal holiday in the Virgin Islands, while all primary elections shall be held on a Saturday. All employees who are required to work on those days shall be entitled to two hours off from their jobs without loss of pay to vote in all primaries and elections, provided that they notify their employers before such primaries or elections of their intention to be absent for the purpose of voting.

Q. Does my vote really make a difference?
The most often heard excuse for not voting in an election is "my one little vote won't make a difference." Yet history is full of instances proving the enormous power of one single vote. In many cases, the course of nations has been changed because one individual ballot was cast -- or not cast -- depending upon your point of view. Consider this:

  • In 1645, one vote gave Oliver Cromwell control of England.
  • In 1649, one vote literally cost King Charles I of England his head. The vote to behead him was 67 against and 68 for -- the ax fell thanks to one vote.
  • In 1776, one vote gave America the English language instead of German (at least according to folk lore.)
  • In 1800, the Electoral College met in the respective states to cast their two votes for President. At that time, the U.S. Constitution provided the candidate receiving the most electoral votes would become President and the candidate receiving the second highest number of votes would become Vice President. When the results of the Electoral College votes were opened by both houses of Congress, there was a tie vote for President between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr. That threw the election of President into the House of Representatives where Thomas Jefferson was elected our third president by a one-vote margin.
  • In 1941, the Selective Service Act (the draft) was saved by a one vote margin -- just weeks before Pearl Harbor was attacked.
  • In 1890, by a one-vote margin, Idaho became a state.

Candidates:

Q. When am I a candidate?
Candidate means an individual who seeks nomination for election, or election, to any elective office of this Territory, whether or not such individual is elected and whether or not such individual has formally or publicly announced his candidacy. However, in order to be a "candidate" a person must have:

  • filed for an elective office with the Board of Elections;
  • received contributions;
  • made expenditures; or
  • authorized another to receive contributions on his behalf or make expenditures in support of his candidacy whether or not a specific office has been named for which the person is running.

Q. Where do I find qualifications for office?

  • Governor and Lt. Governor in the Revised Organic Act of 1954 section 11 Legislature in the Revised Organic Act of 1954 section 6
  • Delegate to Congress Title 18 section 21 Virgin Islands Code
  • Board of Education Title 17 section 21 Virgin Islands Code
  • Board of Elections Title 18 section 41 Virgin Islands Code

Q. When can I obtain and absentee voting list?
Pursuant to Title 18 section 664 applications can be accepted up to 14 days before the day of the election, lists are available after that.

Q. I am interested in running for public office do I have to take a leave or resign?
Persons employed in the legislative, executive or judicial branches of the Government of the United States Virgin Islands shall be eligible for nomination as candidates for public office but any such person who becomes a candidate for public office shall be granted and shall take a leave of absence from his governmental duties from the date of the filing of his nomination petition or paper until the date of the ensuing general election, unless the person is a candidate at a primary election who fails to be nominated, in which case the person's leave of absence may terminate immediately after the primary. Persons becoming candidates may use accrued annual leave in taking such leave of absence. Persons who have no accrued annual leave shall take leave without pay but without prejudice to seniority or other employment rights. This section does not apply to Government employees who become candidates for party offices or serve as party officers, to candidates for the Board of Education, or candidates for the Board of Elections for the Virgin Islands, as provided for under section 41 of chapter 3 of this title, except that no employee or official of the office of the Supervisor of Elections and no employee of a Board of Elections may be a candidate for a Board of Elections without taking leave as required by this section, and if elected, may not serve as an employee or official, as the case may be, during his incumbency. Persons becoming candidates may use accrued or accumulated annual leave or sick leave in taking such leave of absence, however, sick leave may not be used in the absence of such certification of sickness as is required by the Government pursuant to Title 3, section 583, subsection (b) of the Code. Persons taking such leave of absence that have no accrued or accumulated annual leave shall do so without pay but without prejudice to seniority or other employment rights. This section shall not apply to Government employees becoming candidates for party offices or serving as party officers, to candidates for the Virgin Islands Board of Education, as provided for under section 97 of Title 3 of the Virgin Islands Code, or candidates for the Board of Elections for the Virgin Islands, as provided for under section 41  of Title 18  of such Code, except that no employee or official of the Department of Education and no employee of the Board of Education may be a candidate for the Board of Education and no employee or official of the office of the Supervisor of Elections and no employee of a board of election may be a candidate for a board of elections without taking leave as required by this section; and if elected may not serve as an employee or official, as the case may be during his incumbency Pursuant to Tile 18 section 2.

Q. Are their specific forms that are necessary to run for public office?
Candidates are required to complete a number of forms. The main form to be completed is a nomination petition or paper. If you are a member of a political party you will be required to obtain signatures for a petition. If you are not a member of a political party you will be required to obtain signatures for a paper.

For a public office to be filled by a vote of the electors of the territory of the Virgin Islands at large, or for a party office to be filled by election at large, by at least 25 registered and enrolled members of the proper party in each of at least two election districts.

For a public or party office to be filled by election in an election district or island by at least twenty-five (25) registered and enrolled members of the proper party.

Where the nomination is for an office to be filled by the vote of the electors of the territory at large, the nomination paper shall be signed by at least 50 qualified electors of each of at least two election districts.

Where the nomination is for an office to be filled by the vote of the electors of a particular election district only, the nomination paper shall be signed by at least 50 qualified electors of such district.

Q. When is a candidate required to file nomination petition or papers with the Office of the Supervisor of Elections?
After noon on the first Tuesday of August of each general election year and before 5 p.m. seven (7) calendar days thereafter.

Q. When will the Official Election Calendar be ready?
Pursuant to Title 18 section 4(b)(9) the official election calendar is required to be prepared and published prior to June 15th of each election year.

Q. When can I get a voters registration list?
Voter registration list are available at request, and for a cost. However, pursuant to Tile 18 section 4(b)(10) every candidate is entitled to on list by June 15th of the Election year.

Q. Who must file a campaign disclosure report?
Every person, independent of an organized committee, who makes or receives contributions or makes expenditures in an aggregate amount of over $500 during a calendar year, which contributions and expenditures are for the express purpose of advocating the election or defeat of a candidate, shall file reports with the Supervisor during the reporting periods as required of political committees. Such reports shall contain information as required of political committees by section 905 of this chapter, and a statement, under penalty of perjury, as to whether the person's dependent expenditure is made in cooperation, consultation, or concert with, or at the request or suggestion of, any candidate with, or any authorized agent or committee of such candidate.

Any independent expenditure by any person not a political committee or candidate of over $500 or more made after the thirtieth day preceding an election and before the election shall be reported to the Supervisor within 48 hours of the date of the expenditure.

Q. If a candidate funds his campaign entirely with his own personal funds is he still required to file a campaign disclosure report?
Yes, a candidate can contribute any amount of money to his campaign, but he is still required to file a disclosure report.

Q. When are campaign disclosures reports due?
Campaign disclosure reports are dues every six months. In an election year there are pre and post election reports due, in addition to the normal reports.

Q. How can I get an extension for filing my campaign disclosure report?
There are no extensions for filing disclosure reports.

Q. How can I have a voter registration drive?
The Election System of the Virgin Islands does not conduct voter registration drives for candidates.